Sports

Atlanta Falcons’ Food Menu Bucks Trend To Offer Cheaper Eats

Atlanta Falcons president and CEO Rich McKay is reflected in a screen displaying the proposed concession stand menu prices inside the Falcons new stadium currently under construction Monday, May 16, 2016, in Atlanta. Falcons owner Arthur Blank says the Mercedes-Benz Stadium is on schedule to open in June, 2017 as scheduled and he's hoping it will be announced next week as the site of a Super Bowl. The Falcons also unveiled their new food and beverage plan which includes $2 hot dogs and soft drinks, a sharp decrease from current prices at the Georgia Dome. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Atlanta Falcons president and CEO Rich McKay is reflected in a screen displaying the proposed concession stand menu prices inside the Falcons new stadium currently under construction Monday, May 16, 2016, in Atlanta. Falcons owner Arthur Blank says the Mercedes-Benz Stadium is on schedule to open in June, 2017 as scheduled and he's hoping it will be announced next week as the site of a Super Bowl. The Falcons also unveiled their new food and beverage plan which includes $2 hot dogs and soft drinks, a sharp decrease from current prices at the Georgia Dome. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Credit David Goldman / Associated Press
'Add to My List' icon 'Added to My List' icon Add to My List In My List

The Atlanta Falcons want to feed their fans for less. Today Arthur Blank announced that concessions pricing at the Mercedes-Benz Stadium will be priced below the average for NFL stadiums.

Two dollars for sodas and water, $3 for snacks like nachos and pizza, and a domestic beer will cost $5.

JC Bradbury, a sports management economist with Kennesaw State University, said the price change isn’t just from the goodness of the Falcon management’s hearts.

“You want to get as much money out of the rich guy as you can, without cutting off the poor guy – and I’m using extreme generalizations here,” Bradbury said.

He said the Falcons’ move makes sense, because food and drinks are included in many of the premium seating packages.

“If you just watch Falcons games on television, it’s a sell out, but you have to put air quotes around ‘sell-out.’ There are lots of empty seats.”

Bradbury said this move is about filling those seats, which he said makes the game more fun to watch.

Tim Kellison, an assistant professor at Georgia State University focusing on sports administration, said the Falcons’ move bucks a trend at professional football stadiums.

“Dating back to 2013, there’s been steady increase in the cost of menu items that would affect a family of four,” Kellison said.

Falcons and Atlanta United owner Arthur Blank said the pricing is a response to fan surveys, and will be standard beyond just the opening year.

There will also be more places to buy concessions than in the Georgia Dome.