Arts

The Tunewelders Specialize In Creating Dynamic Sonic Soundscapes

Ben Holst is shown with homemade cigar box guitar. Tunewelders, which includes Holst, Jeremy Gilbertson and Jason Shannon, see audio creation as a form of creative expression, utilizing the latest bits of technology while making sure to never lose sight of what they call the most important aspect of audio recording -- the human element.
Ben Holst is shown with homemade cigar box guitar. Tunewelders, which includes Holst, Jeremy Gilbertson and Jason Shannon, see audio creation as a form of creative expression, utilizing the latest bits of technology while making sure to never lose sight of what they call the most important aspect of audio recording -- the human element.
Credit Lauren Kelley

From recording a commercial with a goat chomping on Doritos to scoring a full-length Netflix series set during World War II, the sound designers known as the Tunewelders have created an impressive body of work.

The audio production company was founded by three longtime friends and Atlanta musicians — Ben Holst, Jeremy Gilbertson and Jason Shannon.

The Tunewelders see audio creation as a form of creative expression, utilizing the latest bits of technology while making sure to never lose sight of what they call the most important aspect of audio recording — the human element.

Their latest project saw them writing and producing the score of the new Netflix series “The Liberator.” The soundtrack spans a wide range of different genres and emotions — from grim, dissonant, horror soundscapes to the sounds of French café music.

Holst, Gilbertson and Shannon joined “City Lights” host Lois Reitzes for a conversation about their work and unique creative process.

Interview Highlights

Shannon on the importance of collaboration:

“I think collaboration, you know, working with another creative … it’s one of the hardest things that you can do. But I believe that we’ve found a way to be successful and work together and expand our own individual capabilities by doing exactly that. I think one thing that I would say that what we thrive on is the ability to work together as a group in a very creative setting and be critical … in a good way. I think, at the end of the day, it makes the music better.”

Holst on what makes them stand out:

“I think one thing that we work hard to do is to not accept limitations. There are any number of million-dollar studios and bajillion-dollar microphones and all this process and all this equipment, all this stuff, that certainly can make life easier, maybe more fun sonically. But, you know, we kind of just get it done in a way. If you think of a wizard as somebody who can just get something done, that process isn’t necessarily pretty when it comes down to like making sound effects.”

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