Politics

Cagle, Kemp Make Final Push For Votes Before Primary Runoff Ends

Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle, left, and Secretary of State Brian Kemp continued their campaigns to be the Republican nominee for Georgia governor the day before voters head to the polls. The winner of Tuesday’s election will face Democrat Stacey Abrams in the November general election.
Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle, left, and Secretary of State Brian Kemp continued their campaigns to be the Republican nominee for Georgia governor the day before voters head to the polls. The winner of Tuesday’s election will face Democrat Stacey Abrams in the November general election.
Credit Associated Press file
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Secretary of State Brian Kemp and Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle campaigned across the state Monday, both vying to become Georgia Republicans’ choice for governor.

The two candidates kicked off their statewide flights at DeKalb-Peachtree Airport. Cagle’s first flight took off early in the morning, while Kemp left in the afternoon.

It was part of a final push for votes before the primary runoff race ends Tuesday.

But before Kemp and Cagle could talk about their own campaigns, they had to address the biggest news of the day: the video where Republican state Rep. Jason Spencer dropped his pants and yelled a racial slur.

Cagle called Spencer’s actions “despicable” and called for him to resign.

“I’m just thankful he didn’t endorse my campaign,” Cagle said.

Kemp, who had received Spencer’s support in the past, said in a tweet that he will remove Spencer’s name from his campaign website and materials.

“I know Speaker Ralston’s called on his resignation,” Kemp said. “I think that’s a good idea.”

When asked if he would re-evaluate his own “politically incorrect” behavior, Kemp said he wouldn’t compare his rhetoric to Spencer’s.

“That is not being politically incorrect. That is being unacceptable behavior,” Kemp said. “…Two different things completely.”

Kemp went on to talk about the message he had for his voters in terms of the primary runoff.

“No polling matters. As good as these polls look for us. As good as the momentum is that we’ve seen on the ground, nothing matters but how many votes we get on Tuesday. But that is our message today for our folks is we have to keep working.”

Cagle also had a message of his own.

“This race is not about, you know, how many guns you have or how big your truck is. I’ve got a lot of guns and I’ve got a truck as well,” Cagle said. “It is about the vision for who can manage the ninth largest state in the nation.”

Cagle made nine stops around the state of Georgia on Monday. Kemp made three.