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‘Campus Carry’ Headlines Bills Awaiting Decision From Deal

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal speaks during a press conference, Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014, in Atlanta.  Deal, a Republican, turned back a challenge from Democrat Jason Carter, a state senator and the grandson of former President Jimmy Carter, in Tuesday's election. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)
Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal speaks during a press conference, Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014, in Atlanta. Deal, a Republican, turned back a challenge from Democrat Jason Carter, a state senator and the grandson of former President Jimmy Carter, in Tuesday's election. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)
Credit Branden Camp / Associated Press
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Tuesday is the last day for Gov. Nathan Deal to act on legislation, and several bills still await action from him, including “campus carry” and measures that would mean big changes to the state’s court system.

Deal has sent signals to Republican legislators he’ll veto the campus carry bill they passed, said Brian Robinson, Deal’s former deputy chief of staff. Right now, the bill would allow licensed gun holders to take guns on college campuses, except in student housing or at athletic events.

“Governor came out at the end of the session and pointed out several concerns he had with it, and I don’t know how he can go back on that,” Robinson said.

Deal asked the Legislature to change the bill to give schools more control over where weapons would be allowed.

Robinson said the governor’s strong relationship with the Republican-dominated Legislature would continue despite a veto.

“That relationship is going to survive; it’s going to be strong no matter what he does on campus carry because the Legislature needs him; they trust him,” Robinson said.

Deal will need the Legislature’s support next year to pass major education and criminal justice reforms that have been on his agenda for years.

If the governor doesn’t sign or veto a bill it becomes law, and, unless they say otherwise, laws go into effect July 1.

Here’s a list of some of the other major bills awaiting a decision from the governor:

  • HB 808 would overhaul the agency that monitors judges and the courts. It’s paired with a constitutional amendment that will be on the November ballot;
  • HB 858 would give the state more control of the Fulton County Board of Health;
  • HB 59 would allow individuals to sue the state;
  • HB 927 would add two justices to the Supreme Court of Georgia;
  • HB 1036 imposes moratorium on building any petroleum pipelines in the state;