Politics

Cityhood Groups Emptying Bank Accounts In Final Push

Both sides of the cityhood fight are emptying their bank accounts in a final push to convince voters.
Both sides of the cityhood fight are emptying their bank accounts in a final push to convince voters.
Credit Dan Raby / WABE
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As groups battle over the future of LaVista Hills and Tucker’s cityhood ahead of next week’s Nov. 3 election, DeKalb County election finance reports show they raised more than $80,000 together throughout the campaign. 

Now both sides of the fight are emptying their bank accounts in a final push to convince voters.

Pro-cityhood have been raising money for years over the issue. Most of that money went to feasibility studies meant to prove their ideas were viable. More recently they’ve been spending on yard signs and flyers.

Mary Kay Woodworth, one of the LaVista Hills cityhood leaders, says they have about $6,000 left for flyers and mailers to convince people on the fence to say yes.

“It’s just so they can have an opportunity to read through the documentation and make a really good educated decision to vote yes,” she said.

Frank Auman of the Tucker 2015 board says his group has raised more than $80,000 over the years, and that they’ll spend the few thousand they have left to try to increase voter turnout.

“We want to win it by a big margin with a big number of voters so that going forward everybody feels good about what we’ve done and that we’re kind of all on the same page and pulling together,” said Auman.

Ron McCauley of DeKalb Strong, a group against both LaVista Hills and Tucker’s current plans, says it raised more than $23,000 this year. They’re down to $4,000 now.

“I don’t see that there’s much that we can do beyond what we’ve already done,” said McCauley.

Still, he says that last $4,000 will go toward flyers to convince voters to say no on Nov. 3.