Politics

The Debate On Improving Georgia’s Trauma Care, After Orlando

Grady Memorial Hospital is the Atlanta area's only Level 1 trauma center, which has the most resources to handle a mass casualty event.
Grady Memorial Hospital is the Atlanta area's only Level 1 trauma center, which has the most resources to handle a mass casualty event.
Credit Al Such / WABE

Denis O'Hayer's report on Georgia's trauma care system, including interviews with state Sen. Renee Unterman, R-Buford, and Dr. Brooks Moore of the Emory School of Medicine (Broadcast Version)Denis O'Hayer's report on Georgia's trauma care system, including interviews with state Sen. Renee Unterman, R-Buford, and Dr. Brooks Moore of the Emory School of Medicine (Expanded Version)

Nearly 15 years after the Sept. 11 attacks, the nation’s systems of trauma care are still struggling to adequately prepare for the demands that could come from another mass casualty event.  

Georgia’s trauma care system is no exception, and the recent massacre in Orlando, Florida, raises the question: Could Georgia’s trauma centers handle something with that number of seriously injured people, if it happened here?  

Experts in the health care field, and in the Legislature, think we do not have enough trauma care facilities to handle something like that.

But paying the big improvement bill will not be easy. In 2010, voters rejected a proposed fee on car tags, with the money earmarked for a state trauma care network.

On “Morning Edition,” WABE’s Denis O’Hayer spoke with state Senate Health and Human Services Committee chair Renee Unterman, R-Buford, and Dr. Brooks Moore, assistant professor of emergency medicine in the Emory School of Medicine and assistant medical director of the emergency room at Grady Memorial Hospital. Grady is the Atlanta area’s only Level 1 trauma center.

WABE brings you the local stories and national news that you value and trust. Please make a gift today.Donate Now