News, Politics

Delaware Eclipses Georgia In Replacing Voting Machines

A federal judge decided Monday that Georgia can go forward with its current electronic voting system for November's general election. Delaware is looking at creating a paper trail at the ballot box.
A federal judge decided Monday that Georgia can go forward with its current electronic voting system for November's general election. Delaware is looking at creating a paper trail at the ballot box.
Credit John Bazemore / Associated Press file

While digital technology may have turned ink and paper into somewhat of a relic, calls for paper ballots at the polls are proving — to an extent, anyway —  that everything old is new again.

On Monday, federal Judge Amy Totenberg ruled Georgia can go forward with its current electronic voting system for November’s general election. The decision comes after voters’ rights advocates filed suit seeking the court to intervene and require that Georgia implement a paper ballot.

In her ruling, however, Totenberg scolded Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp’s office for its handling of election security.

“There is nothing like bureaucratic confusion and long lines to sour a citizen,” Totenberg said.

Georgia is one of 14 states using machines that lack a paper trail that voters can use to verify their vote.

That number is about to be 13.

On Tuesday’s “All Things Considered,” Delaware Public Media political reporter Sarah Mueller told host Jim Burress about efforts that state is undertaking to create a paper trail at the ballot box.

WABE political reporter Johnny Kauffman also joined the conversation to talk about what Election Day 2020 could look like in Georgia as the state faces replacing its decades-old voting system.