Demolition Crews Finish Tearing Down Site Of Former Recording Studio

After nearly three months of delays, the demolition crew on Friday afternoon finished tearing down the place where the first country music hit was recorded nearly 100 years ago.

Ron Harris / Associated Press

A worker operating a backhoe loader tore apart a small brick building at 152 Nassau Street, across the street from Centennial Olympic Park in downtown Atlanta.

After nearly three months of delays, the demolition crew on Friday afternoon finished tearing down the place where the first country music hit was recorded nearly 100 years ago.

Preservationists had filed two lawsuits alleging the city didn’t follow proper procedures when it made an agreement with a developer. That delayed the demolition, which initially began Aug. 8 before a judge temporarily ordered work to stop.

But both suits were eventually dropped.

Architect Kyle Kessler became the public face of the effort to save the former studio where Fiddlin’ John Carson recorded “Little Old Cabin in the Lane” in 1923.

“One of the things that’s unique about this building is that it was a recording studio. So we still have the records and the music that was recorded there,” said Kessler on Thursday after he announced he was dropping his lawsuit against the city.

Kessler says he plans to be involved in future efforts to save other historically significant buildings in Atlanta.

“Hopefully, I can help push for them to make real change in the city so that we never have to face this unfortunate situation again,” he said.

A 21-story Margaritaville-themed hotel is planned for the site.