Closer Look: 50 Years Since The Assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

In this April 3, 1968 file photo, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. stands with other civil rights leaders on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., a day before he was assassinated at approximately the same place. From left are Hosea Williams, Jesse Jackson, King, and Ralph Abernathy.
In this April 3, 1968 file photo, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. stands with other civil rights leaders on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., a day before he was assassinated at approximately the same place. From left are Hosea Williams, Jesse Jackson, King, and Ralph Abernathy.
Credit Charles Kelly, File / Associated Press

Wednesday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

  • 0:00: Fifty years ago today, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. We revisit conversations and reflections from our ATL68 series remembering that day.
  • 17:51: As the nation mourned the death of Dr. King, the body of the Civil Rights leader was brought back to his home in Atlanta. His last sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church, a recording of his famous ‘Drum Major Instinct’ sermon, was played at the funeral on April 9. The private funeral was followed by a procession from Ebenezer Baptist Church to Morehouse College. Now, 50 years later, The King Center has organized a recreation of this funeral procession, which will take place on April 9, 2018. We speak with Reverend Jared Sawyer, who has been working to organize the march and drum up millennial support, and Rachel Parish, artistic director of Firehouse Creative Productions and creator of the Drum Major Project, which organized community engagement projects leading up to the reenactment.
  • 35:04: After his death, people from around the world came to visit Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s body at Spelman College. The woman playing the organ for those visitors was Dr. Joyce Johnson, professor emerita and Spelman College organist. We hear her reflections.
Dr. Joyce Johnson, professor emerita and Spelman College organist. (Candace Wheeler/WABE)