Closer Look: Award-Winning Journalist Scott Pelley; Racial Inequity Between Communities North & South Of I-20; Decatur Superintendent Overrules Policy Of “Alternative” Lunch For Students With Unpaid Balances

Award-winning journalist Scott Pelley, 60 Minutes correspondent and former CBS Evening News anchor, reflects on his career in the new memoir "Truth Worth Telling: A Reporter's Search for Meaning In The Stories Of Our Times".
Award-winning journalist Scott Pelley, 60 Minutes correspondent and former CBS Evening News anchor, reflects on his career in the new memoir "Truth Worth Telling: A Reporter's Search for Meaning In The Stories Of Our Times".
Credit Grace Walker

Friday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

  • 0:00: Rose gives a news brief on DeKalb County School Superintendent Dr. Stephen Green’s decision to not seek a contract extension after the next school year. The district will immediately begin looking for a new superintendent, according to a statement from the DeKalb County School District. A national search will begin next month, and Dr. Green will remain to help transition the role through his final day on June 30, 2020.
  • In other DeKalb County news, an email sent to parents at the City Schools of Decatur said students with unpaid lunch balances of more than $10 would receive a peanut butter and jelly sandwich for the rest of the school year, according to Decaturish. City School of Decatur Superintendent David Dude has since overruled the practice. We learn more from Dan Whisenhunt, owner and editor of Decaturish.
  • 7:30: For over four decades, award-winning journalist Scott Pelley, 60 Minutes correspondent and former CBS Evening News anchor, has been covering stories of national and global importance. He reflects on his career in the new memoir, “Truth Worth Telling: A Reporter’s Search for Meaning In The Stories Of Our Times”. Pelley stopped by our Closer Look studios, while here in Atlanta, to reflect on his career, the important role of journalists today and the responsibilities of media consumers.
  • 36:50: In 2015, the Annie E. Casey Foundation released a report detailing how race and place could change the trajectory of an Atlanta child’s life. The report, titled Changing the Odds: The Race for Results in Atlanta, surveyed 25 Neighborhood Planning Units across the city to see how people were living. What did they find? In their words: “a city divided.” Predominantly NPUs north of I-20 were found to have a number of resources, such as higher incomes and more jobs. Meanwhile, those south of the I-20 divide saw less reliable transit and fewer job opportunities. Now, four years later, the Foundation is following up with a new report. This time, the results show some improvements in equity, but authors also note there is a lot of work to still be done. Here to discuss the organization’s recommendations for moving the city forward is Janelle Williams, senior associate of the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Atlanta Civic Site.
Janelle Williams, senior associate of the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Atlanta Civic Site, discusses the foundation’s latest survey of inequity in Atlanta. (Photo credit: Grace Walker)

Closer Look is produced by Candace Wheeler and Grace Walker. Joy Barge is a contributing producer.