Closer Look: Buckhead Residents Forced to Vacate Homes; Lyft Launches Recording Booth in Atlanta Hub; And More

The Darlington residents, Alina Jefferson and Supreme Shands, visits the "Closer Look" studio to talk about how they were recently given a 60-day notice to vacate the building.
The Darlington residents, Alina Jefferson and Supreme Shands, visits the "Closer Look" studio to talk about how they were recently given a 60-day notice to vacate the building.
Credit Emilia Brock

Thursday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

  • 0:00: Rose gives a news brief about how earlier today, Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms signed an executive order regarding the city jail and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detainees. That executive order asks federal immigration officials to remove all current detainees from the city jail.
  • 3:44: Residents of The Darlington apartment complex in Buckhead were recently given a 60-day notice to vacate the building. The Darlington’s new owner, Hammond Residential, cited plans to renovate the facilities and raise rents. Tenants say they were not given enough time, and have limited immediate alternatives in the Buckhead area. We’re joined by three of the building’s residents, Alina Jefferson and Supreme Shands.
The Darlington residents say that management didn’t keep up the building, including the trash. Photo credit: Supreme Shands
  • 21:25: This summer, Lyft announced a one-of-a-kind initiative: a recording booth in its Atlanta hub. Why? Because many of Lyft’s drivers say that driving for the company allows them the flexibility to pursue their dreams. This mini studio is one way the company hopes to encourage them even further. The recording booth is available free of charge to Atlanta musicians who also drive with Lyft. Producer Emilia Brock visited the company’s Atlanta hub to learn more about the initiative from Sam Bond, general manager for Lyft Southeast, and watch local musicians Shawn Don and duo KIN4LIFE taking the new studio for a spin.
From L-R: Local musicians IQ, Shawn Don and Nor record music in Lyft’s new studio. IQ and Nor make up the group KIN4LIFE. Photo credit: Emilia Brock
  • 37:33: While Georgia’s population has doubled over the last four decades, most of that growth has been “concentrated in seven metro counties” – mostly Atlanta and Savannah. That leaves the state’s rural communities with a declining population. In fact, there are 11 rural counties in Georgia that had a lower population in 2010 than was counted back in 1860 – over 150 years ago. All of this data comes from a 2017 report released by the House Rural Development Council. It’s a two-year working group made up of lawmakers who have been tasked with finding solutions facing Georgia’s rural communities. One of their recommendations? The creation of the “Center for Rural Prosperity and Innovation”. We’re joined by the co-chair for the House Rural Development Council, Georgia Representative Terry England, a Republican who represents Auburn.

Closer Look is produced by Candace Wheeler, Emilia Brock and Trevor Young.