Closer Look: Curling v. Kemp — Voting and Cybersecurity; Program for Disabled Transitioning to Home Life; And More

Candice Hoke, founding co-director of the Center for Cybersecurity & Privacy Protection at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, talked to the "Closer Look" team about Georgia's election security.
Candice Hoke, founding co-director of the Center for Cybersecurity & Privacy Protection at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, talked to the "Closer Look" team about Georgia's election security.
Credit PATRICK SEMANSKY / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wednesday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

  • 0:00: Rose gives a news brief about how the Atlanta Motor Speedway is opening its camping facilities to those seeking refuge from Hurricane Florence. It is now a Category Four hurricane as it heads toward the coast of the Carolinas and Georgia. It is expected to make landfall by Thursday morning, and the latest from the National Weather Service finds the hurricane shifting south toward Savannah.
  • 3:04: Today, attorneys began oral arguments in a federal court case centered on Georgia’s election security. Last year, a lawsuit was filed by several Georgia residents, and election security advocates, against Secretary of State Brian Kemp and a number of state elections officials over the state’s use of electronic voting machines – some of which are over a decade old. But election officials warn that a switch to paper ballots so close to Election Day would lead to long lines, confusion, lower turnout, and burdensome costs. Cybersecurity experts say that the case, known as Curling v. Kemp, could have national implications for election security. We speak with Candice Hoke, founding co-director of the Center for Cybersecurity & Privacy Protection at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law.
  • 23:20: Since 2006, the program “Money Follows The Person” has helped disabled Georgians transition back to home life. The program provides renovations to an individual’s home to make it more accessible and help disabled people become more independent. Closer Look recently visited Robyn Thibodeaux at her home in Lilburn, to see how this program has helped her. We also learn more about the program from Cheryl Harris with the Georgia Department of Human Services.
  • 40:20: A new report from Georgetown University finds it’s getting harder for students to work their way through college. Particularly, low-income students must work more hours, resulting in lower grades and completion rates. According to the report, nearly 60 percent of low-income working students who work more than 15 hours a week earn grades of C or lower on average. We dig deeper into the report with Nicole Smith, chief economist with the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.

Closer Look is produced by Candace Wheeler, Emilia Brock and Trevor Young.