Closer Look: Election 2018 — Amendment 4, Marsy’s Law

Dr. Kay Levine, associate dean of faculty and professor of law at Emory University School of Law, talks about what passing the Marsy's Law would mean for Georgians.
Dr. Kay Levine, associate dean of faculty and professor of law at Emory University School of Law, talks about what passing the Marsy's Law would mean for Georgians.
Credit Emilia Brock

Tuesday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

Today’s special edition of “Closer Look” focuses on Amendment 4 on the ballot for the upcoming election here in Georgia, otherwise known as Marsy’s Law.

  • 0:00: Rose gives a news brief about how President Donald Trump and former President Barack Obama have scheduled trips to Georgia this week, just before midterm election day. Former President Obama plans to arrive on Friday to stump for Stacey Abrams — and the other Democratic candidates, including Sarah Riggs Amico, Carolyn Bourdeaux, and Lucy McBath. That rally will be at Morehouse College at 5 p.m. Then on Sunday, a White House official confirmed to the Associated Press that President Trump will be in Georgia campaigning for Brian Kemp. That will be in Macon at the Middle Georgia Regional Airport at 4 p.m.
  • 3:26: Georgia’s Victims Bill of Rights became law in 1996. This year, voters will vote whether to take some of these victims rights to the Georgia Constitution, through Amendment 4, otherwise known as Marsy’s Law. We speak with its sponsor, State Senator John F. Kennedy.
  • 24:27: Marsy’s Law was originally passed in California in 2008, and other states have either adopted it into their constitutions or there are efforts to pass it. In those states, and in Georgia, there are those who support the constitutional amendment and those who are concerned about the consequences. So what does the amendment actually say and do? What does the language mean for both victims and the accused? We speak with Dr. Kay Levine, associate dean of faculty and professor of law at Emory University School of Law, about what passing the amendment would mean for Georgians.
  • 42:32: Marsy’s Law is not without its critics. Given that Georgia already has some of the strongest victims rights laws in the country codified into law, some say that this constitutional amendment isn’t even necessary. And, due to complications that other states have experienced with Marsy’s Law, there are concerns about potential unintended consequences if the amendment passes here in Georgia. We speak with Benita Dodd, vice president of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation.

Closer Look is produced by Candace Wheeler, Emilia Brock, and Grace Walker.