Closer Look: Reflections on 50 Years Since The Assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Clockwise: Journalist Kathryn Johnson was one of the few women who covered the civil rights movement; Dr. King speaks in 1964; W.J. Michael Cody was one of the attorneys representing King in 1968; Doug Shipman, president and CEO of the Woodruff Arts Center and a scholar on Dr. King; and Dr. Joyce Johnson, who played the organ in 1968 at Spelman College while King was lying in repose.
Clockwise: Journalist Kathryn Johnson was one of the few women who covered the civil rights movement; Dr. King speaks in 1964; W.J. Michael Cody was one of the attorneys representing King in 1968; Doug Shipman, president and CEO of the Woodruff Arts Center and a scholar on Dr. King; and Dr. Joyce Johnson, who played the organ in 1968 at Spelman College while King was lying in repose.
Credit Clockwise: Candace Wheeler/WABE; Associated Press; Candace Wheeler/WABE; Christine Dempsey/WABE; Candace Wheeler/WABE

Friday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

Today is a special edition of Closer Look as we revisit conversations that reflect on the life, legacy and importance of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s work and leadership.

  • 0:00: We hear a conversation with Doug Shipman, president and CEO of the Woodruff Arts Center and a scholar on Dr. King.
  • 19:13: Fifty years ago, in 1968, sanitation workers in Memphis, Tennessee were on strike. As part of the strike, Dr. King led a protest in March, and returned on April 3. To prevent Dr. King’s involvement in another march, the city went through a federal judge to issue an injunction blocking his participation. So, the civil rights leader needed a lawyer in Memphis. We speak with one of the attorneys representing Dr. King at the time, W.J. Michael Cody.
  • 31:40: Journalist Kathryn Johnson was one of the few women who covered the civil rights movement. And while a reporter for the Associated Press, she was welcomed into the circle of Dr. King. Johnson recalls her experiences with the King family, and tells us about her book, “My Time with the Kings.”
  • 42:15: After his death, people from around the world came to visit Dr. King’s body at Spelman College. The woman playing the organ for those visitors was Dr. Joyce Johnson, professor emerita and Spelman College organist. We hear her reflections.

Discover more about the life, legacy and leadership of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the 50 years since his assassination by visiting ATL68.

Closer Look is produced by Candace Wheeler, Emilia Brock and Grace Walker.