Closer Look: Reproductive Rights Advocates Respond to Alabama Abortion Restrictions; Georgia’s Civil Health Scores Drop; Mercer University Graduate Kenya Anderson

 This photograph released by the state shows Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey signing a bill that outlaws most abortion in the state on Wednesday, May 15, 2019, in Montgomery, Alabama.
This photograph released by the state shows Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey signing a bill that outlaws most abortion in the state on Wednesday, May 15, 2019, in Montgomery, Alabama.
Credit Hal Yeager/Alabama Governor's Office via AP

Thursday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

  • 0:00: Rose gives a news brief on former President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter’s health. According to the Carter Center, earlier today, Mr. Carter was released from the Phoebe Sumter Medical Center. He’s been receiving medical care at the center following a fall on Monday where he broke his hip. Then, yesterday, former First Lady Carter was admitted to the medical center after feeling faint. The former president is still expected to teach Sunday school, as usual, later this week. He will also undergo physical therapy.
  • And in other news, Georgia Governor Brian Kemp has called for the resignation of Georgia Insurance Commissioner Jim Beck. Beck appeared in federal court yesterday to plead not guilty to charges of embezzling more than $2 million from the Georgia Underwriting Association, his former employer. He was indicted Tuesday on 38-counts of money laundering, wire fraud and mail fraud.
  • 3:53: Alabama Governor Kay Ivey signed a bill into law, yesterday, which will ban most abortions in the state, with no exception for cases of rape or incest — there is an exception for pregnancies that pose a “serious” health risk. Under this new law, doctors could face felony charges and up to 99 years in prison for performing an abortion, if the measure goes unchallenged in court. A look at what this new law, and others such as Georgia’s HB 481 heartbeat bill, could mean for access to abortion nationwide. Kwajelyn Jackson, executive director of the Feminist Women’s Health Center, an organization that provides a range of healthcare services, including abortion care and Megan Gordon-Kane, public affairs coordinator at the Center, weigh-in.
Kwajelyn Jackson, executive director of the Feminist Women’s Health Center, an organization that provides a range of healthcare services, including abortion care and Megan Gordon-Kane, public affairs coordinator at the Center, weigh-in on abortion restrictions signed into law in Alabama yesterday. (Photo credit: Grace Walker)
  • 24:43: Levels of voting, volunteering and donating to charitable causes have all dropped in Georgia, according to a new survey released by the Georgia Family Connection Partnership. The organization compared a number of Georgia’s civic health indicators in 2019 to six years ago in 2013 and, overall, the group found that Georgia’s civic health levels aren’t very strong. How does GFCP define ‘civic health’? And what implications could this have for the future of the state? We ask Rebecca Rice, Georgia Kids Count Manager at the Georgia Family Connection Partnership.
Rebecca Rice, Georgia Kids Count Manager at the Georgia Family Connection Partnership, discusses civic health in Georgia. (Photo credit: Grace Walker)
  • 41:55: Closer Look continues its graduation series with recent Mercer University graduate Kenya Anderson. She joins us to talk about her journey to graduation, and her future plans to use her recently completed Masters of Divinity, which was inspired by her grandmother, a preacher who started homeless shelters.
Kenya Anderson graduated from Mercer University on Monday, May 13 with master’s of divinity degree. (Photo credit: Grace Walker)

Closer Look is produced by Candace Wheeler and Grace Walker. Joy Barge is a contributing producer.