Closer Look: Serial Murderer Samuel Little; Seattle Planning Commission’s Report “Neighborhoods for All”; Pet Safety During the Holidays

Bibb County Sheriff David Davis talks about how Samuel Little (pictured) evaded arrest for 40 years.
Bibb County Sheriff David Davis talks about how Samuel Little (pictured) evaded arrest for 40 years.
Credit Damian Dovarganes / AP File Photo

Thursday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

  • 0:00: Rose gives a news brief about how, according to the Henry County police department, a shooting inside a dentist’s office occurred earlier today. Now so far, reports are that one person believed to be the shooter is dead. A police officer was critically injured — possibly a gunshot wound to the face — and has been transported to Grady Hospital. As with many officer-involved-shootings, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation now takes over.
  • 1:25: Georgia-native Samuel Little is a 78-year-old man who recently confessed to killing at least 90 people. Two of those murders took place in Macon, Georgia. If his confession is true, why was he able to evade arrest for 40 years? We speak with Bibb County Sheriff David Davis.
  • 18:15: Christmas time is here. But, the hustle and bustle of the holidays can get a little chaotic, especially with pets underfoot. From Christmas trees to “people food,” there are a lot of potential holiday hazards for pets and pet owners this time of year. Joining us in studio to discuss how to keep your pet safe during the holidays are Dr. Janine Franco, veterinarian at The Village Vets of Decatur, and Samantha Shelton, CEO and founder of Furkids Animal Rescue and Shelters. We’re also joined by Shelton’s daughter, Emily.
(Left to Right) Dr. Janine Franco, veterinarian at The Village Vets of Decatur, Emily Shelton and her mother Samantha Shelton, CEO and founder of Furkids Animal Rescue and Shelters, discuss ways to keep pets safe during this holiday season. Photo credit: Emilia Brock
  • 38:19: Building is booming in Atlanta. But how can these developments also work to encourage diversity, equity, and affordability? That’s a question many major cities — in the U.S. and around the world — are trying to answer, including Seattle. In fact, the Seattle Planning Commission just released a new report that highlights “missing middle housing” and how it could contribute to more diverse, walkable, and livable urban neighborhoods. We hear more about the report, called “Neighborhoods for All: Expanding housing opportunity in Seattle’s single-family zones.” from Michael Austin, vice chair of the Seattle Planning Commission.

Closer Look is produced by Candace Wheeler, Emilia Brock and Grace Walker.