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‘Good Trouble’: New Documentary Tells The Story Of Civil Rights Icon Rep. John Lewis

On Monday's edition of "Closer Look," award-winning director Dawn Porter joined the program to tell the story behind the creation of the documentary "John Lewis: Good Trouble."
On Monday's edition of "Closer Look," award-winning director Dawn Porter joined the program to tell the story behind the creation of the documentary "John Lewis: Good Trouble."
Credit Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

At 80 years old, United States Rep. John Lewis is known as of the most prominent figures of the civil rights movement.

Born in rural Alabama and the son of sharecroppers, Lewis endured multiple arrests and injuries as the leader of peaceful and non-violent protests across the south.

He has been called “the conscience of the U.S. Congress” and has dedicated his life to building what he calls “the Beloved Community.”

Thousands of protests. 45 arrests. 33 years in Congress. Sometimes change calls for a little trouble. John Lewis: Good Trouble comes to theaters and on demand July 3rd. #JohnLewisIsGoodTrouble

Posted by John Lewis: Good Trouble on Monday, May 11, 2020

Now, a new documentary aims to tell his story, blending archival footage and stories from the 1960s to now. The film “John Lewis: Good Trouble” includes interviews with Lewis’ family, friends, and fellow political leaders.

On Monday’s edition of “Closer Look,” award-winning director Dawn Porter joined the program to tell the story behind the creation of the documentary.

In the conversation, Porter shared how her previous film, “Bobby Kennedy For President” led her to tell Lewis’ story, and why she believes Lewis’ fight for voting rights remains relevant today.

“The one thing we can all take from John Lewis is an example of a positive person in government. They are there. There are people who are working for the right reasons,” Porter said. “I hope that this will inspire people’s faith in our government once again.”

  • Dawn Porter, director of “John Lewis: Good Trouble”

To hear the full conversation, click on the audio player above.