Politics

Gov. Deal Responds To Federal Transgender Bathroom Directive

The White House has advised schools to let students use the bathroom for the gender with which they identify. In this photo, a sign marks the entrance to a gender neutral restroom at the University of Vermont in Burlington, Vt., Thursday, Aug. 23, 2007.
The White House has advised schools to let students use the bathroom for the gender with which they identify. In this photo, a sign marks the entrance to a gender neutral restroom at the University of Vermont in Burlington, Vt., Thursday, Aug. 23, 2007.
Credit AP Photo/Toby Talbot
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Gov. Nathan Deal Tuesday went public with his opposition to the White House directive to schools on bathrooms for transgender students.

Deal issued a statement saying the Obama administration’s new policy has “generated confusion and controversy among parents, students and school officials,” and went on to say he “does not believe the directive carries the force of law.”

The White House has advised schools to let students use the bathroom for the gender with which they identify.

Deal’s statement says he’s waiting on action from Congress, and is asking the state school superintendent to provide guidance to schools in the meantime.

Here’s Deal’s full statement:

“The Obama administration’s directive, recently announced by press release, to local school systems regarding accommodations for transgender students has generated confusion and controversy among parents, students and school officials. While I do not believe this directive carries the force of law, the Departments of Justice and Education have threatened to revoke federal funding from schools that fail to comply. Georgia’s constitution and state laws, however, require these decisions be made at the local level. While our 181 school systems must each determine an appropriate response to this federal overreach, I have asked State School Superintendent Richard Woods to provide guidance to those local school systems seeking assistance and clarity on this issue in order to ensure that there will be as much uniformity across our state as possible. Until Congress acts, I assure the citizens of Georgia that the offices of the governor, attorney general and state school superintendent will work cooperatively to protect the interests of Georgia’s children from this abuse of federal executive authority.”

Johnny Kauffman contributed to this report.