Environment, Science

Learning About Proctor Creek By Studying Its Wildlife

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists are documenting the crayfish and other wildlife that lives in Atlanta's Proctor Creek.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists are documenting the crayfish and other wildlife that lives in Atlanta's Proctor Creek.
Credit Alison Guillory / WABE
Some of the rain that falls in downtown Atlanta eventually forms Proctor Creek, which flows through the west side of the city and into the Chattahoochee River. Like the rest of Atlanta’s creeks, Proctor Creek is polluted. But it still has wildlife living in it.
Scientists are learning more about the health of the creek and its critters by studying crayfish.

 

  A longer version of this story was published and aired last fall. 

This is part of a continuing series about Proctor Creek that airs on “Morning Edition” with WABE host Denis O’Hayer. Previous stories have covered the history of activism in the area, the root of the problems with the creek and public health. Other stories will look at past and future solutions to fixing the creek.