City Cafe

NPR’s Cokie Roberts Discusses New Children’s Book

Cokie Roberts reads from her new book in WABE's Studio 4.
Cokie Roberts reads from her new book in WABE's Studio 4.
Credit Dan Raby / WABE

Morning Edition contributor Cokie Roberts spent ten years as NPR’s congressional correspondent. But her life in politics didn’t begin there. Her parents were Congresswoman and ambassador Lindy Boggs and Congressman Hale Boggs, who served both as House Majority Leader and as a member of the Warren Commission.

Cokie Roberts’s latest work is a picture book for children about an earlier political era still. Founding Mothers: Remembering the Ladies explores the lives of women who made a difference during the colonial era. Recently, City Café host John Lemley sat down to talk with Roberts about the book, and we decided to re-visit the conversation now, in the waning days of Women’s History Month.

In part one of this interview, he began by asking her about a quip she’s frequently made—that most history books would have you believe this country was built entirely by men.

Broadcast version of part one of interview that aired Tuesday, February 11, 2014

In the second part of this conversation, John Lemley asked Cokie Roberts about a founding mother who actually did a couple of her husband Benjamin Franklin’s jobs for him.

Broadcast version of part two of interview that aired Tuesday, February 11, 2014

In this extended web edit, Cokie Roberts tells even more stories of the nation’s founding mothers, including how Martha Washington invented the job of first lady, and the story of Phillis Wheatley, the enslaved Bostonian woman who became a renowned poet.

WEB EXTENDED version of conversation that aired Tuesday, February 11, 2014