Arts

Oxford American Explores Georgia’s Musical Landscape

Accompanying the Oxford American's Georgia Music Issue is a 25-track CD, featuring iconic Georgia musicians like James Brown, and also a few lesser-known artists like R&B and Soul singer Sandy Gaye.
Accompanying the Oxford American's Georgia Music Issue is a 25-track CD, featuring iconic Georgia musicians like James Brown, and also a few lesser-known artists like R&B and Soul singer Sandy Gaye.
Credit Courtesy of Oxford American

 

James Brown created an altogether new type of music called “funk.” The Allman Brothers Band pioneered an influential blues-y rock ‘n’ roll sound unique to the South. And OutKast made the world finally pay attention to Southern rap.  

What do these musicians all have in common? They came from Georgia.

In the newest issue of “Oxford American,” the literary magazine explores Georgia’s musical landscape. It is the latest in their series of Southern Music issues.

Oxford American’s editor Eliza Borné and its managing editor Maxwell George are in town for the Georgia Music Issue launch party Monday night at Eddie’s Attic, as well as a reading taking place at Criminal Records tomorrow.

They stopped by WABE’s studios to talk with “City Lights” host Lois Reitzes about artists and stories covered in the newest release. They read an excerpt from an essay by one southern writer exploring his connection to OutKast and also listened to a unique cover of Ray Charles’ “Midnight” by the Athens-based Futurebirds.