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Restaurants Join Fulton County In Anti-Sex Trafficking Campaign

In 2011, a placard of a child sits on a table during an Atlanta conference on the fight against human trafficking. The Georgia Restaurant Association is asking its members to voluntarily post signs in restrooms to help victims of human trafficking.
In 2011, a placard of a child sits on a table during an Atlanta conference on the fight against human trafficking. The Georgia Restaurant Association is asking its members to voluntarily post signs in restrooms to help victims of human trafficking.
Credit David Goldman / Associated Press file
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The Georgia Restaurant Association is asking its members to voluntarily post signs in restrooms to help victims of human trafficking.

Georgia law requires such signs to be posted in bars, bus stops, hotels, urgent care centers and other locations, but not in restaurants. The signs are to include a hotline for the National Human Trafficking Resource Center: 1-888-373-7888.

Because of a law that was passed last year by the Board of Commissioners, some restaurants in Fulton County are required to post signage.

The problem is that the law can only be enforced within a small area of Fulton County, Chairman Robb Pitts said at a news conference Monday, which was broadcast live on Facebook.

Since officials can’t enforce the law statewide, GRA is encouraging restaurants to post the signs voluntarily.

“I felt that it would be an easy way for our industry to help with this issue,” GRA CEO Karen Bremer said in a phone interview.

The GRA serves approximately 18,000 restaurants in Georgia.

Bremer also talked about how restaurants serve as community “cornerstones” that not only provide food but jobs and help to the areas they serve.

“If we can save one person, then it’s worth it.”