This is a newsmagazine featuring the key stories of the day that are relevant to you.  It’s a community forum for and about metro Atlanta. Host Rose Scott knows the ins and outs of covering news important around Atlanta.

She’ll lead discussions on the issues that impact where we live. WABE’s news team is going into metro Atlanta neighborhoods to provide context, storytelling and a sense of place. You’ll hear not only from the biggest newsmakers, but also from folks who don’t often get a voice.

“Closer Look” features a mix of local national and international stories and interviews. It’s an interactive space to share ideas and dig deeper into issues. It’s not just about Atlanta; it’s a program for Atlanta.

Featured Episode

Closer Look: Summer Indie Music Series; FEMA Leader; And More

Friday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

  • 0:00: The local interfaith community is planning a rally, and interfaith prayer, this evening outside Atlanta’s Israeli consulate. Organizers say they are calling on the City of Atlanta to stop sending Atlanta Police Department officers to the Middle East for training in police tactics. Connie Sosnoff, from the Jewish Voice for Peace, tells us why the group is standing in solidarity with Palestinian demonstrators in the Middle East.
  • 6:58: We check-in with WABE’s legal analyst, Page Pate, on a host of legal topics including DeKalb County Sheriff Jeff Mann’s plea deal and the drowning death of a 5-year old at a day camp.
  • 24:00: Brock Long is the nation’s top emergency management official, he was appointed by President Donald Trump to lead FEMA, the country’s natural disaster response agency. Rose Scott speaks to administrator Long about his vision for the agency.
  • 35:17: We continue our Summer Indie Music series with Brother Hawk — a four piece contemporary alt-rock band.
  • 46:00: The rollercoaster, the Georgia Cyclone, retires this weekend. WABE intern La’ Candis Brown heads to Six Flags Over Georgia to find out what park-goers will miss about the decades old rollercoaster.

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Disclosure: One of the members of Brother Hawk is related to WABE producer Myke Johns.

Closer Look: Fulton County Opiod Abuse Prevention Plan; And More

Tuesday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

  • 0:00: Last year, Fulton County recorded 154 opioid-related deaths while it had 143 in 2015, 130 in 2014 and 86 in 2013. Fulton County Commission Vice Chairman Bob Ellis talks about the county’s new ‘Opioid Misuse & Abuse Prevention’ plan.
  • 18:26: Since the election of President Donald Trump there have been calls for more town hall meetings with members of congress. WABE’s Lisa Hagen reports on how accessible elected officials have been.  
  • 25:47: U.S.-based agricultural company called AGCO is trying to change the face of farming in Africa to alleviate food insecurity in that region. The Global Report on Food Crises in 2017 shows risk of famine in isolated areas of northeast Nigeria, South Sudan, Somalia and Yemen. Nuradin Osman, vice president and general manager of Africa for AGCO, tells us how they help Africa’s farmers from Duluth, Georgia.
  • 40:22: This week Stateline, a project of The Pew Charitable Trusts, released its 2017 Legislative Review. Scott Greenberger, executive editor of Stateline, talks about the trends and issues that dominated debate in state capitols, across the nation, during the last legislative session.

CORRECTION: Scott Greeberger from Stateline clarifies statement heard in segment. In Massachusetts, voters in November 2016 approved a law legalizing recreational marijuana use. But the Massachusetts legislature made significant changes to the measure, including raising cannabis taxes from what the ballot question envisioned, merging oversight of recreational and medical marijuana, and changing how cities and towns can ban pot shops.

In Florida, voters in November 2016 approved a constitutional amendment legalizing medical marijuana. But in crafting a law to implement it, Florida legislators banned the smoking of marijuana products, something critics complain violates the spirit of the constitutional amendment. Supporters of the amendment have sued the state to give residents the right to smoke medical marijuana in their own homes. 

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Closer Look: Insect Venom Shortage; National Book Club Conference; And More

Monday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

  • 0:00: Rose Scott gives a news brief on several civil rights groups that are threatening lawsuits against Cobb and Gwinnett Counties. The organizations, which include The ACLU of Georgia and Asian Americans Advancing Justice-Atlanta, say some voters reported receiving “purge notices,” suggesting they will become “inactive voters” and removed from voter rolls if they don’t take steps to maintain their registration.
  • 2:00: It’s peak insect bite season, and there is a shortage in a vital extract used for fatal insect allergic reactions in humans. It’s causing doctors and allergists to ration antidote injections  the vital extracts in these injections include honeybee, hornet and wasp venom. Dr. Stanley Fineman talks about how the shortage has affected Atlanta.
  • 14:55: Ray Summerour is the owner of Brenda’s Grocery Store in the Baptist Town neighborhood located in Marietta. He’s been in a seven-year long dispute with the city of Marietta about a property he refuses to sell to the city, where it wants to build a park. We learn more about the case, which has reached the Georgia Supreme Court from Summerour and his attorneys, Harry Camp and Don Evans.
  • 36:47: This year marks the 15th anniversary of the National Book Club Conference, which highlights African-American authors and readers. We speak to its founder, Curtis Bunn, about the mission and legacy of the conference as well as the literary and publishing industry for African-American authors.

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Closer Look: Summer Music Series; Brookhaven Mayor; And More

Friday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

  • 0:00: We continue to follow the story of the residents of Park Villa apartments in Brookhaven. Mayor John Ernst tells us about the city’s response after residents were given notices that they had until the end of July to move out of their homes. This happened after the property was sold to a new developer. The mayor also gives us an update on his talks with the developer and how the city plans to respond to affordable housing concerns throughout the city.
  • 20:38: Then, we hear from two current Park Villa residents Maria Tapia and Melinda Ward. Also joining the conversation is Rebekah Morris, executive director of Los Vecinos de Buford Highway, an advocacy group that’s working to help Park Villa resident to find housing.
  • 39:33: Dr. Lonnie Johnson, is perhaps best known for his invention of the Super Soaker. He talks about the people in his life that inspired his career.
  • 42:30: In our summer indie music series,  A Drug Called Tradition stops by to perform.

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Closer Look: State Rep. Sam Park; Park Villa Apartments Controversy; And More

Wednesday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

  • 0:00: Georgia is the second best place to do business, according to the business news company CNBC. Scott Cohn, a CBNC special correspondent, explains how Georgia landed the number two spot and what’s keeping the state from taking first place.
  • 18:13: This year was Rep. Samuel Park’s first in the General Assembly. With his election, Park, D-Lawrenceville, became the first openly gay man to the Georgia House of Representatives. He talks about his freshman year as a lawmaker and the legislative issues he’s focused on.
  • 39:15: This month residents at the Park Villa Apartment Homes in Brookhaven were given notices that they had 30 days to move out of their homes  the notices came after the property was sold to a new developer. We speak to attorneys, Lindsey Siegel and Mara Block with the  Atlanta Legal Aid Society who have provided counsel to tenants on their rights.

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Closer Look: Super Soaker Inventor Lonnie Johnson; ATV Fines; And More

Tuesday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

  • 0:00: Rose Scott gives a news brief on local reaction to the latest Senate health care plan which has collapsed due to lack of votes.
  • 1:22: Dr. Lonnie Johnson is well known for inventing the popular water toy, the Super Soaker. He joins Rose to talk about his long career and his work to increase diversity in technology.
  • 25:00: The Atlanta City Council recently approved increased fines for ATV drivers, which based on multiple offenses, could include a $1,000 fine and 30 days to six months in jail. Councilwoman Joyce Sheperd, who introduced the ordinance, tells us more.
  • 37:59: The Atlanta City Council also recently voted to impose a six-month moratorium on accepting any application to remove more than 10 trees on residential zoned parcels of five acres or larger. Councilwoman Natalyn Archibong, who proposed the measure,  talks about why it was needed to protect the city’s tree canopy.

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