This is a newsmagazine featuring the key stories of the day that are relevant to you.  It’s a community forum for and about metro Atlanta. Host Rose Scott knows the ins and outs of covering news important around Atlanta.

She’ll lead discussions on the issues that impact where we live. WABE’s news team is going into metro Atlanta neighborhoods to provide context, storytelling and a sense of place. You’ll hear not only from the biggest newsmakers, but also from folks who don’t often get a voice.

“Closer Look” features a mix of local national and international stories and interviews. It’s an interactive space to share ideas and dig deeper into issues. It’s not just about Atlanta; it’s a program for Atlanta.

Featured Episode

Closer Look: Insect Venom Shortage; National Book Club Conference; And More

Monday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

  • 0:00: Rose Scott gives a news brief on several civil rights groups that are threatening lawsuits against Cobb and Gwinnett Counties. The organizations, which include The ACLU of Georgia and Asian Americans Advancing Justice-Atlanta, say some voters reported receiving “purge notices,” suggesting they will become “inactive voters” and removed from voter rolls if they don’t take steps to maintain their registration.
  • 2:00: It’s peak insect bite season, and there is a shortage in a vital extract used for fatal insect allergic reactions in humans. It’s causing doctors and allergists to ration antidote injections  the vital extracts in these injections include honeybee, hornet and wasp venom. Dr. Stanley Fineman talks about how the shortage has affected Atlanta.
  • 14:55: Ray Summerour is the owner of Brenda’s Grocery Store in the Baptist Town neighborhood located in Marietta. He’s been in a seven-year long dispute with the city of Marietta about a property he refuses to sell to the city, where it wants to build a park. We learn more about the case, which has reached the Georgia Supreme Court from Summerour and his attorneys, Harry Camp and Don Evans.
  • 36:47: This year marks the 15th anniversary of the National Book Club Conference, which highlights African-American authors and readers. We speak to its founder, Curtis Bunn, about the mission and legacy of the conference as well as the literary and publishing industry for African-American authors.

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Closer Look: Summer Music Series; Brookhaven Mayor; And More

Friday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

  • 0:00: We continue to follow the story of the residents of Park Villa apartments in Brookhaven. Mayor John Ernst tells us about the city’s response after residents were given notices that they had until the end of July to move out of their homes. This happened after the property was sold to a new developer. The mayor also gives us an update on his talks with the developer and how the city plans to respond to affordable housing concerns throughout the city.
  • 20:38: Then, we hear from two current Park Villa residents Maria Tapia and Melinda Ward. Also joining the conversation is Rebekah Morris, executive director of Los Vecinos de Buford Highway, an advocacy group that’s working to help Park Villa resident to find housing.
  • 39:33: Dr. Lonnie Johnson, is perhaps best known for his invention of the Super Soaker. He talks about the people in his life that inspired his career.
  • 42:30: In our summer indie music series,  A Drug Called Tradition stops by to perform.

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Closer Look: State Rep. Sam Park; Park Villa Apartments Controversy; And More

Wednesday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

  • 0:00: Georgia is the second best place to do business, according to the business news company CNBC. Scott Cohn, a CBNC special correspondent, explains how Georgia landed the number two spot and what’s keeping the state from taking first place.
  • 18:13: This year was Rep. Samuel Park’s first in the General Assembly. With his election, Park, D-Lawrenceville, became the first openly gay man to the Georgia House of Representatives. He talks about his freshman year as a lawmaker and the legislative issues he’s focused on.
  • 39:15: This month residents at the Park Villa Apartment Homes in Brookhaven were given notices that they had 30 days to move out of their homes  the notices came after the property was sold to a new developer. We speak to attorneys, Lindsey Siegel and Mara Block with the  Atlanta Legal Aid Society who have provided counsel to tenants on their rights.

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Closer Look: Super Soaker Inventor Lonnie Johnson; ATV Fines; And More

Tuesday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

  • 0:00: Rose Scott gives a news brief on local reaction to the latest Senate health care plan which has collapsed due to lack of votes.
  • 1:22: Dr. Lonnie Johnson is well known for inventing the popular water toy, the Super Soaker. He joins Rose to talk about his long career and his work to increase diversity in technology.
  • 25:00: The Atlanta City Council recently approved increased fines for ATV drivers, which based on multiple offenses, could include a $1,000 fine and 30 days to six months in jail. Councilwoman Joyce Sheperd, who introduced the ordinance, tells us more.
  • 37:59: The Atlanta City Council also recently voted to impose a six-month moratorium on accepting any application to remove more than 10 trees on residential zoned parcels of five acres or larger. Councilwoman Natalyn Archibong, who proposed the measure,  talks about why it was needed to protect the city’s tree canopy.

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Closer Look: MARTA Tech; Sexual Abuse Allegations At Boarding School; And More

Monday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:

  • 0:00: Rose Scott gives a news brief on a special meeting held by the Atlanta Board of Education to discuss a pending ethics complaint.
  • 2:00: How is President Donald Trump’s travel ban affecting local immigrant families in Georgia? We speak to local immigration attorney, Hiba Ghalib, and her client to find out.
  • 19:31: In June, a lawsuit was filed that alleges sexual abuse at a historic Georgia boarding school, the Darlington School, in Rome, Georgia. Rose speaks to attorney Darren Penn who represents the alleged victims.
  • 38:10: WABE’s Elly Yu reports on the uncertain future of the “Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals” program that protects young immigrants from deportation.
  • 40:22: MARTA recently got rid of its blue Breeze cards in an effort to improve security. We speak to MARTA’s Assistant General Manager of Technology, Ming Hsi, about the changes and other tech innovations for the transit agency.

Note of disclosure: WABE’s broadcast license is held by the Atlanta Board of Education. 

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Closer Look: State Rep. Brenda Lopez; Atlanta’s Tree Canopy; And More

 
Thursday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott”:
  • 0:00: Rose Scott gives a news brief on a confirmed human case of West Nile virus in the city of Brookhaven.
  • 2:18: The Atlanta City Council has approved measures to protect the city’s tree canopy. The ordinance imposes a 180-day moratorium on accepting any application to remove more than ten trees on residential zoned parcels of five acres or larger. Councilwoman Natalyn Archibong, who proposed the ordinance, tells us more.
  • 19:30: State Rep. Brenda Lopez, D-Norcross, is Georgia’s first Latina in the general assembly. She tells us about what her win has done for the Latino community and the state.
  • 40: 51: We continue our affordable housing series, with a look at the concept of tiny houses coming to to the city of Clarkston. Bob Boyd, executive director of Habitat for Humanity in DeKalb, and Clarkston Mayor, Ted Terry tell us more.

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