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Surviving Player From Negro League’s Atlanta Black Crackers Meets President Obama

President Barack Obama greets Red Moore during a greet with former Negro League baseball players in the Grand Foyer of the White House, Aug. 5, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

This official White House photograph is being made available only for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photograph. The photograph may not be manipulated in any way and may not be used in commercial or political materials, advertisements, emails, products, promotions that in any way suggests approval or endorsement of the President, the First Family, or the White House.
President Barack Obama greets Red Moore during a greet with former Negro League baseball players in the Grand Foyer of the White House, Aug. 5, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza) This official White House photograph is being made available only for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photograph. The photograph may not be manipulated in any way and may not be used in commercial or political materials, advertisements, emails, products, promotions that in any way suggests approval or endorsement of the President, the First Family, or the White House.
Credit Official White House Photo by Pete Souza

It was a big day for the men and women of the historical Negro Baseball League.

Monday, August 5th, some of the living members were honored by President Obama at the White House.

Atlanta’s own James “Red” Moore is in Washington for the ceremony and WABE’s Rose Scott has his story.

It’s 1938.

A 21-year old Ella Fitzgerald is making a name for herself.

In Georgia another twenty something year old is playing for the Atlanta Black Crackers.

Standing 5’10 and weighing just over 160 pounds, first baseman James “Red” Moore bats and throws left.

At that time the Atlanta Black Crackers were part of the Negro American League.

Black men were not allowed to play in the majors and it would be nine years before a fellow Georgian, Jackie Robinson, would break the color barrier.

Now more than a half-century later, along with other men and yes women, Red Moore from the Negro Baseball Leagues will be honored by the nation’s commander in chief.

When reached by phone just hours before the ceremony, 96-year-old Moore told WABE he was honored to be a part of the session.

Red Moore is the only living member from the Atlanta Black Crackers.

Long-time family friend Greg White is accompanying Mr. Moore and his family.

He also helped spearhead donations to make it possible for Red, his wife and a step-son to make the DC trip.

White says he didn’t want the family to have to pay for anything.

“Well, we raised 1, 330 dollars, which basically included that flight and hotel arrangements.”

Red Moore was a pretty good hitter, but it was his defense according to Negro League historians that thrilled the hometown crowd.

It’s said Moore had soft hands, a strong arm and could turn a double play with ease.

And just as important  says Greg White, James “Red” Moore served his country and the city of Atlanta.

“Mr. Moore is a living legend, an Atlanta sports figure, civil rights figure that helped changed society and while we still got him, I’d just like people to really embrace his great story.”