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Three Decades Of Atlanta’s AIDS Epidemic Told Through A T-Shirt Quilt

Over her three-decade career working with AIDS patients, Jacque Muther has amassed a lot of related T-shirts. As she prepares to retire, she's commissioned Juanita Williams to craft them into a keepsake quilt.
Over her three-decade career working with AIDS patients, Jacque Muther has amassed a lot of related T-shirts. As she prepares to retire, she's commissioned Juanita Williams to craft them into a keepsake quilt.
Credit Jim Burress / WABE

  

In June of 1987, a small group of people gathered in San Francisco, California. They feared history would soon forget their friends and loved ones who were quickly dying of AIDS.

Members of that group came up with a collective idea ─ make a quilt. Many now know it as the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial QuiltIt has more than 48, 000 panels, and it is housed and cared for here in Atlanta. 

By the time that group met, Jacque Muther was already working with Atlanta’s early AIDS patients. Three decades later, she continues that work as a grants manager for the Ponce de Leon Center, which is part of the Grady Infectious Disease Program.

Later this year, Muther plans to retire.

To mark the decades of memories, she herself has commissioned a quilt. When finished, it will be a mash-up of panels made from T-shirts she’s collected over the years. 

WABE’s Jim Burress dropped in on Muther as she met with quilter Juanita Williams.Jim Burress' feature on Jacque Muther's quilt.

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