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US Supreme Court Could Decide Not To Revisit 1973 Abortion Ruling

Protesters march Sunday to the Alabama Capitol in Montgomery to protest a law passed last week making abortion a felony in nearly all cases there. WABE legal analyst Page Pate spoke to "All Things Considered" host Jim Burress about new abortion laws in Georgia and other states, the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling and the U.S. Supreme Court.
Protesters march Sunday to the Alabama Capitol in Montgomery to protest a law passed last week making abortion a felony in nearly all cases there. WABE legal analyst Page Pate spoke to "All Things Considered" host Jim Burress about new abortion laws in Georgia and other states, the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling and the U.S. Supreme Court.
Credit Butch Dill / Associated Press

As Georgia and other states pass laws banning certain abortions, what does that mean for women who might seek to terminate their pregnancies?

The short answer: Nothing. Yet.

None of the laws has taken effect. And legal challenges mean they likely won’t — at least while the constitutionality of the provision is sorted out.

To get a sense of what that sorting out process looks like, WABE legal analyst Page Pate spoke to “All Things Considered” host Jim Burress about where the state stands now, legally speaking, on HB 481.