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WABE’s Week in Review: Georgia Candidates Talk Post Trump’s Coronavirus Diagnosis and Arbery’s Killing Examined Through Historical Lens

Rep. Doug Collins and Sen. Kelly Loeffler both spoke and the Faith and Freedom Conference in Cobb County this week. Recent polling has put the two Republicans within striking distance of each other in the special free-for-all election.
Rep. Doug Collins and Sen. Kelly Loeffler both spoke and the Faith and Freedom Conference in Cobb County this week. Recent polling has put the two Republicans within striking distance of each other in the special free-for-all election.
Credit Matt Rourke and Russ Bynum / Associated Press photos

After President Trump confirmed he had tested positive for the coronavirus, top Republican candidates for Georgia’s Senate seat held by Kelly Loeffler spoke at the Faith and Freedom Conference in Cobb County, where masks were not required.

Loeffler began by wishing Trump and the first lady well, and then she turned her attention to China, which has become a priority of her nine-month tenure as a Senator.

“China brought this virus to our country. They gave it to President Trump, to the first lady,” said Loeffler. “They’ve made the WHO [World Health Organization] complicit in its spread. They’ve stolen our intellectual property, they’ve spied on us.”

Loeffler’s main Republican challenger, Congressman Doug Collins also spoke at the event.

“I walked outside just a few minutes ago and gave an interview, and it was one of the most depressing things I gave in my life.  All they wanted to talk about was,  ‘Are you scared?’…  ‘Are you wearing a mask?'” said Collins. “All I wanted to say is this country is the greatest country in the world. We’ll never back up for who we are.”

Loeffler promised to spend $20 million of her own money on the race and has nearly five times the amount of campaign funds as Collins.

Recent polling has put the two Republicans within striking distance of each other in the special free-for-all election.

Also in striking distance is Pastor Raphael Warnock, who is the top polling Democrat.

Trust in Big Bird… 

PBS President and CEO Paula Kerger
PBS President and CEO Paula Kerger, seen here in February 2019, spoke to “All Things Considered” host Jim Burress about the broadcasting services 50th anniversary. (Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP)

The Public Broadcasting Service will mark its 50th anniversary Sunday, and its most recognizable and seasoned stars of “Sesame Street” have stood the test of time.

But love and nostalgia for Big Bird, Elmo, Cookie Monster and even Oscar the Grouch aren’t the main reasons PBS has been around for a half-century.

President and CEO Paula Kerger told WABE’s “All Things Considered” host Jim Burress that it comes down to maintaining public trust in its children’s programs and its news offerings.

The Past Keeps Coming Back Again…

A mural of Ahmaud Arbery, painted last spring, is on display in Brunswick, Georgia, where the 25-year-old man was shot and killed in February.
A mural of Ahmaud Arbery, painted last spring, is on display in Brunswick, Georgia, where the 25-year-old man was shot and killed in February. (Sarah Blake Morgan/Associated Press)

Season three of WABE’s podcast, “Buried Truths,” examines the Ahmaud Arbery killing through a historical lens.

Arbery, a young Black man, was out for a jog in a neighborhood in Glynn County, Georgia. He never made it home. He was chased down by two white men and shot to death.

“There are too many echoes of these old cases that are showing up in the Ahmaud Arbery case,” said Hank Klibanoff, host of WABE’s Peabody Award-winning podcast.

“Morning Edition” host Lisa Rayam has more with Klibanoff, who is also an Emory University professor of practice in English and creative writing.

The pandemic is just another hurdle to exercising… 

Edwin Moses
Edwin Moses is an Olympic gold medalist, sports administrator and diplomat. (Courtesy of Laureus USA)

For about a decade in the ’70s and ’80s, Edwin Moses was unbeatable at the 400m hurdles. The Morehouse star won gold medals at two Olympics, held several world records and was an icon in one of the track and field’s golden eras.

“Closer Look” host Rose Scott talked with Moses about the importance of sports in development and how to exercise safely during a pandemic. The two also talked about the first Sport for Good Day by Laureus USA, which encourages everyone to engage in at least 60 minutes of safe, socially-distant, physical activity.