News, Politics

New Georgia Project says it’s registered close to 30,000 new voters

Voters go to the polls at Sara Smith Elementary polling station, in the Buckhead district, on January 5, 2021 in Atlanta during the Georgia Senate runoff elections. (Photo by virginie kippelen / AFP) (Photo by VIRGINIE KIPPELEN/AFP via Getty Images)
Voters go to the polls at Sara Smith Elementary polling station, in the Buckhead district, on January 5, 2021 in Atlanta during the Georgia Senate runoff elections. (Photo by virginie kippelen / AFP) (Photo by VIRGINIE KIPPELEN/AFP via Getty Images)
Credit Virginie Kippelen / AFP via Getty Images

Oct. 4 is the deadline for Georgians to register to vote in the November general election. One voting rights organization has been banking on a younger block of voters to reach their 30,000 registrations goal.

The New Georgia Project tells WABE’s “All Things Considered” host Jim Burress that its work meeting young people where they are — with lighthearted, block-party style events — has helped those registration numbers tally up. NGP officials say they don’t ask anyone about party affiliation, and conversations are more focused on issues like climate action and voter suppression.

But even though the events are meant to be lighthearted, they’ve yielded some serious results. The latest 2020 data from the U.S. Election Assistance Commission estimates that out of nearly 7.5 million Georgians eligible to vote, about 95% are actively registered.

Officials also say the passing of Georgia’s GOP-pushed new voting law might have motivated more voter registration.

But young people are also skeptical, especially in Georgia, says Keron Blair, the New Georgia Project’s chief organizing and field officer. The question he gets most often? “Why should I vote?”

When he spoke recently with Burress, he started with how he typically responds to a seemingly simple, but complex question.

https://twitter.com/fairfightaction/status/1443704905269604372?s=20

If you’re not sure if you’re correctly registered to vote, or kicked off the rolls, you can check your status here before the end of business day on Oct. 4 to find out.

Lily Oppenheimer contributed to this report.