News, Politics

How Iranian Conflict Is Likely To Influence Georgia In November

On Thursday, demonstrators protest outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington during a House vote to measure limiting President Donald Trump's ability to take military action against Iran. Recent events involving Iran have created even more division in an already polarized U.S. political landscape.
On Thursday, demonstrators protest outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington during a House vote to measure limiting President Donald Trump's ability to take military action against Iran. Recent events involving Iran have created even more division in an already polarized U.S. political landscape.
Credit Jose Luis Magana / Associated Press

The United States’ recent strike that killed Iranian military commander Qasem Soleimani, followed by Iran’s subsequent revenge missile attack on a U.S. military base, has created even more division in an already polarized political landscape.

Republican U.S. Rep. Doug Collins of Gainesville, Georgia, claimed Wednesday on the Fox Business Channel that the incident proved Democrats are “in love with terrorists.” Similar rhetoric came from Democrats.

Is this evidence of a new low in an already separated U.S., or a repeat of the status quo?

Professor Kerwin Swint is director of the School of Government and International Affairs at Kennesaw State University, and on Thursday’s “All Things Considered,” he spoke with WABE’s Jim Burress about the potential political ramifications possibly tied to Iran.