Environment

Ga. Researchers Ask For Help Watching For Monarch Butterflies This Winter

Researchers at the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, the University of Georgia, Monarchs Across Georgia and Journey North are collecting information about monarch sightings in Georgia between now and March.
Researchers at the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, the University of Georgia, Monarchs Across Georgia and Journey North are collecting information about monarch sightings in Georgia between now and March.
Credit Linda May / DNR
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Monarch butterflies, the striking orange and black insects known for their long migrations, usually pass through Georgia in the spring and fall.

But some are staying here in the winter, instead of going all the way to Mexico, so Georgia wildlife scientists are asking for the public’s help counting butterflies this winter.

Researchers at the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, the University of Georgia, Monarchs Across Georgia and Journey North are collecting information about monarch sightings in Georgia between now and March.

Anyone who sees a monarch can report it on Journey North’s website.

According to the state Department of Natural Resources, monarch migration has changed in recent years because of human activities.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife is studying whether the butterflies need protection under the Endangered Species Act.

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