Election 2020, Local, News, Politics

How A Clark Atlanta Student Is Getting Out The Vote In Georgia

Alexis Harris, a doctoral student of political science at Clark Atlanta University, spoke with WABE about how she's keeping the momentum going among friends and family to make sure they vote in January.
Alexis Harris, a doctoral student of political science at Clark Atlanta University, spoke with WABE about how she's keeping the momentum going among friends and family to make sure they vote in January.
Credit D'Eligant Harris

As Georgians get ready to vote for who will represent them in the U.S. Senate, more Get Out the Vote efforts are taking place across the state.

WABE spoke with 26-year-old Alexis Harris, a doctoral student of political science at Clark Atlanta University. She’s also the Get Out the Vote Georgia fellow at the organization Vote Run Lead, which trains women to run for office.

Harris spoke about how she’s keeping the momentum going among friends and family to make sure they vote in January. 

On momentum to get Georgians to vote in January:

We have got to phone bank for our lives. We have got to get out the vote. We’ve got to get everyone in our community and our families to make their voices heard. It’s going to take a collective effort. And honestly, no matter what side anyone is voting for, I want to see high turnout in January for this runoff.

We know typically runoff elections do much more poorly than the initial elections in November. But I’m hoping that because of the national attention and the statewide attention that this runoff is receiving, we’re able to keep that momentum going and to turn out voters. And get new voters registered between now and the runoff in January.

On how she’s reaching family, friends and neighbors:

I have really been just sending out text messages. Sharing things on social media. Making sure everyone is informed and aware of when early voting begins and when the runoff election is. Making sure people know their polling locations. I placed my application for my absentee ballot, and I did the same for my mom. We made sure we sat down and did that together. So just making sure that everyone is aware that “hey, it’s not over yet.”

On the importance of not doing mobilization efforts on your own:

I think it’s important for everyone to remember the importance of movement work. And to find an organization or several organizations that you can be part of and that value your efforts and your contributions to the community. Because we cannot do this stuff by ourselves. The work is very arduous and it will wear you out if you’re not in a movement. So, join an organization, find your community and move forward as a collective.