Coronavirus, News

New Study On Prescription Video Games To Treat COVID-19 Brain Fog

Dr. Faith Gunning, a neuropsychologist and the vice-chair of Research in the Department of Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medicine, joins "Closer Look" to discuss why some people experience brain fog after recovering from COVID-19 and a new study she’s conducting to see if a prescription video game could be an effective form of treatment.
Dr. Faith Gunning, a neuropsychologist and the vice-chair of Research in the Department of Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medicine, joins "Closer Look" to discuss why some people experience brain fog after recovering from COVID-19 and a new study she’s conducting to see if a prescription video game could be an effective form of treatment.

A New York-based neuropsychologist says the variability of COVID-19 and the ongoing symptoms people have after the acute recovery phase of the virus is very striking.

Dr. Faith Gunning, the vice-chair of research in the Department of Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medicine was a guest on Tuesday edition of “Closer Look.”

She talked with show host Rose Scott about the acute and long haul recovery stages of COVID-19 and why some people experience brain fog after recovering from the coronavirus.

“The main hallmark feature of brain fog is really the disruption of attention and everything that goes along with that,” explained Gunning.

During the conversation, Gunning shared that doctors are still learning about the virus, brain fog, its long-term effects and symptoms.

Gunning also shared details about a new clinical study she’s launching to see if Akili’s EndeavorRx, a therapeutic prescription video game, could be an effective form of treatment for people experiencing brain fog after recovering from COVID-19.

To listen to the full conversation, click the audio player above.