Politics

Carolyn Bourdeaux To Ask For A Recount, Joins Democrats In Seeking More Time

Incumbent Republican Congressman Rob Woodall, right, has 901 more votes than Democratic challenger Carolyn Bourdeaux, left, in the race for Georgia's 7th Congressional District. She said Monday that she will ask for a recount.
Incumbent Republican Congressman Rob Woodall, right, has 901 more votes than Democratic challenger Carolyn Bourdeaux, left, in the race for Georgia's 7th Congressional District. She said Monday that she will ask for a recount.
Credit CAROLYN FOR CONGRESS/ROB WOODALL FOR CONGRESS
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The governor’s race in Georgia is still too close to call. Even as lawsuits are pending, counties are moving ahead with the vote-counting process.

Democrat Carolyn Bourdeaux, a candidate for the 7th U.S. Congressional District, said Monday she will ask for a recount.

That’s after she filed an emergency motion in federal court Sunday night asking for Gwinnett County to receive more time to certify election results. 

The Secretary of State’s office says the deadline for counties to certify results is Tuesday. Some counties in the state have already certified results.

Bourdeaux trails Republican incumbent Rob Woodall by just 900 votes. Woodall has not yet declared victory.

The 7th Congressional District includes Gwinnett County, one of the most diverse counties in Georgia and the Southeast.

Bourdeaux said she’s joining a lawsuit to have all legitimate absentee ballots counted.

“Right now in Gwinnett, there are thousands of voters whose votes are not being counted,” Bourdeaux said. “This is because the Gwinnett Board of Elections has decided that the most minor of errors means that absentee ballots are getting thrown out. Two-thirds of these voters are people of color.”

This is different from the class action complaint filed Sunday by Democratic candidate for governor Stacey Abrams, who also asked for counties to receive more time to accept ballots that were rejected for missing information.

“In the absence of technical and legal direction from Defendant Crittenden, it would be improper, unfair, and contrary to the Fourteenth Amendment’s guarantee of due process of law for any county registrar to continue to reject absentee ballots for missing or insufficient oath information,” the complaint reads. Robyn Crittenden is Georgia’s interim secretary of state.

Abrams’ opponent, former Secretary of State Brian Kemp, was in charge of overseeing elections and has declared himself Georgia’s governor-elect.

The deadline for the Secretary of State’s office to finalize the 2018 general election results is the end of the day on Nov. 19.

WABE reporter Johnny Kauffman contributed to this report.