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Confederate Flag Rally Planned At Stone Mountain Park

A Confederate flag, at left, flies at the base of Stone Mountain next to variations of itself and an American flag Tuesday, June 30, 2015, in Stone Mountain, Ga. At Georgia's iconic Stone Mountain, where the Confederacy is enshrined in a giant bas-relief sculpture, the Ku Klux Klan once held notorious cross-burnings and rebel battle flags still wave prominently, officials are considering what to do about those flags. The park, which now offers family-friendly fireworks and laser light shows, is readying its "Fantastic Fourth Celebration" Thursday through Sunday, and multiple Confederate flag varieties are still displayed at the mountain's base. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
A Confederate flag, at left, flies at the base of Stone Mountain next to variations of itself and an American flag Tuesday, June 30, 2015, in Stone Mountain, Ga. At Georgia's iconic Stone Mountain, where the Confederacy is enshrined in a giant bas-relief sculpture, the Ku Klux Klan once held notorious cross-burnings and rebel battle flags still wave prominently, officials are considering what to do about those flags. The park, which now offers family-friendly fireworks and laser light shows, is readying its "Fantastic Fourth Celebration" Thursday through Sunday, and multiple Confederate flag varieties are still displayed at the mountain's base. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Credit David Goldman / Associated Press

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Pro-Confederate flag crowds plan to gather at Stone Mountain Park Saturday. The rally was planned before someone left battle flags near Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Over 900 people have RSVP’ed “yes” to a Facebook event page for the rally. Event organizers say they won’t allow any offensive speech, racial slurs, alcohol or violence.

“They’ll be in a certain section of the park that may be away from most of the public,” said John Bankhead, a spokesman for the Stone Mountain Park Department of Public Safety. “We’re hoping it’ll be a peaceful, uneventful rally.”

Bankhead said the park has no role in the rally, and anyone who pays the parking fee can come in.

There has been attention on Stone Mountain and its carving since a gunman killed nine people in a church in South Carolina in June. Earlier this month, the Atlanta chapter of the NAACP called for the carving of three Confederates to be removed from the mountain, and the Atlanta City Council passed a resolution asking the state to look into honoring other people on the mountain.