Health, News

Emory epidemiologist’s research explores breast cancer disparities for Black women

Dr. Lauren McCullough, a breast cancer epidemiologist and assistant professor at Emory’s Rollins School of Public Health, discusses her research that focuses on why Black women in Atlanta and several other counties, who have breast cancer, have worst health outcomes than their white counterparts.
Dr. Lauren McCullough, a breast cancer epidemiologist and assistant professor at Emory’s Rollins School of Public Health, discusses her research that focuses on why Black women in Atlanta and several other counties, who have breast cancer, have worst health outcomes than their white counterparts.
Credit Courtesy of Lauren McCullough

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women in the United States.

In fact, it’s estimated in the U.S. that every thirteen minutes, a woman dies from breast cancer.

On Monday’s edition of “Closer Look” Dr. Lauren McCullough, a breast cancer epidemiologist and assistant professor at Emory’s Rollins School of Public Health, talked with show host Rose Scott about a county-level mapping exercise in Georgia and her research that focuses on why Black women in Atlanta with breast cancer have worse health outcomes than their white counterparts.

McCullough says her research examines the biological and social factors to better understand breast cancer mortality.

“Women who live in a redlined neighborhood are 60 times more likely to die,” explained Dr. McCullough.

To listen to the full conversation, click the audio player above.