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PBS Project ‘Un(re)solved’ Reveals More Than 150 Cold Case, Racially Motivated Murders

Overall, "Un(re)solved" explores whether America's inability to confront its racist past has kept it from moving forward. It does that through the Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crimes Reauthorization Act. The murder of 14-year-old Till in 1955 brought national attention to racial violence in the South.
Overall, "Un(re)solved" explores whether America's inability to confront its racist past has kept it from moving forward. It does that through the Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crimes Reauthorization Act. The murder of 14-year-old Till in 1955 brought national attention to racial violence in the South.
Credit Associated Press file

PBS’ longtime investigative series “FRONTLINE” has dropped its latest: A multiplatform project that reveals more than 150 cold case, racially motivated murders — mostly of Black Americans.

“FRONTLINE” producers note that 26 victims in the database are from Georgia, second only to Mississippi, which lists 56. The podcast is narrated by award-winning journalist James Edwards.

Overall, “Un(re)solved” explores whether America’s inability to confront its racist past has kept it from moving forward.

It does that through the Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crimes Reauthorization Act, co-sponsored by the late Georgia Congressman John Lewis.

The amended version of the measure, passed in 2016, allows unsolved cases from the civil rights era to be reopened.

The act also expresses that the Department of Justice should keep families and witnesses of the crimes regularly informed about the status of the investigations and hold accountable, under federal and state law, individuals who were perpetrators of, or accomplices in, unsolved civil rights murders and disappearances.

The DOJ must also submit an annual report on its findings to Congress.

WABE’s “All Things Considered” host Jim Burress recently spoke with “Un(re)solved” creative director Tamara Shogaolu and “FRONTLINE” executive producer Raney Aronson-Rath, starting with how Georgia fits into the project.

Lily Oppenheimer contributed to this report.