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A Question of Authority: President Obama and Immigration

FILE - In this Nov. 7, 2014 file photo, President Barack Obama meets with Congressional leaders in the Old Family Dining Room of the White House in Washington. From left are, House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, Obama, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. Republican leaders and President Barack Obama say the message of the midterm elections is clear: Voters want them to work together. But on what? The two parties’ voters, like their politicians, are far apart on health care, immigration and climate change, exit polls show. The voters can’t even agree on whether the economy is looking worse or getting better.(AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 7, 2014 file photo, President Barack Obama meets with Congressional leaders in the Old Family Dining Room of the White House in Washington. From left are, House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, Obama, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. Republican leaders and President Barack Obama say the message of the midterm elections is clear: Voters want them to work together. But on what? The two parties’ voters, like their politicians, are far apart on health care, immigration and climate change, exit polls show. The voters can’t even agree on whether the economy is looking worse or getting better.(AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
Credit Evan Vucci / Associated Press

On Nov. 20, 2014, President Barack Obama will announce the executive actions he will take on the nation’s troubled immigration system.  

The President is expected to expand the policy that grants temporary deportation relief to undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children.

But, whatever one thinks of the policy change, does the Constitution give the President the power to do that on his own?  

WABE’s Denis O’Hayer spoke with Emory Law professor Polly J. Price.Broadcast VersionExpanded Version